Community Hangout | COP28 is over, what’s next?

Don't miss this opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the post-COP28 landscape and to engage with experts in the field.

🌱 At COP28, governments managed to establish several positive indicators for the future direction of climate action. Two noteworthy achievements on the international stage include the consensus reached on operationalising the Loss and Damage Fund, addressing the devastating impacts of climate change evident since COP27. Additionally, a historic milestone was marked with the negotiated text explicitly calling for a ‘transition away from fossil fuels in energy systems, in a just, orderly and equitable manner‘—a crucial step towards addressing the root causes of climate change.

These accomplishments, coupled with numerous additional agreements between countries, are crucial given the pressing need for swift climate action this decade. However, we want to learn more about COP28 and we want the Caribbean perspectives. 

Were island voices heard? Are the outcomes what our Caribbean delegations were hoping for? What do the outcomes mean for the Caribbean nations? What were the key Caribbean and island-focused stories coming out of the climate summit in Dubai? What’s next?

Join us as we look deeper into COP28 with our two special guest speakers at our upcoming Caribbean Community Hangout – COP28 is over, what’s next?

We’ll have the privilege of learning from Kristin Qui, an experienced climate diplomacy advisor with Climate Analytics Caribbean. Kristin will provide valuable insights into the significant developments and decisions made during COP28.

Additionally, we are excited to have Kalain Hosein, one of Climate Tracker’s COP28 Climate Justice Journalism Fellows, share the top stories emerging from the summit. Kalain’s firsthand experiences and perspectives will bring a unique and informative angle to the discussion.

Don’t miss this opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the post-COP28 landscape and to engage with experts in the field. Register now to secure your virtual seat, and let’s explore together the future of climate action in the Caribbean! 🚀🌊

  📅 Date: Thursday, 25th January 2024
  ⏰ Time: 10am (AST | Trinidad and Tobago time)
  📍 Location: Google Meet (details provided upon registration)

COP28

Kristin has extensive experience in international climate change negotiations on carbon markets and climate finance. Kristin supports Small Island Developing States on a range of climate change topics and represents Trinidad and Tobago in carbon market negotiations under the Paris Agreement. 

Most recently, she served as Chair of the Article 6.4 Supervisory Body – the Body tasked with developing international carbon market rules under the Paris Agreement. Prior to joining Climate Analytics, Kristin worked with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) on reducing emissions from the aviation sector. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Studies from St. John’s University and a Masters in Environmental Management from Yale School of the Environment.

Kalain is an award-winning multimedia journalist based in Trinidad and Tobago. Since 2014, he has reported on weather, climate, and the environment for his online media company, Trinidad and Tobago Weather Center.

In 2019, Kalain joined Guardian Media Limited in Trinidad and Tobago as their Weather Anchor, producing compelling weather, climate, and environment coverage across television, print, digital, and radio. He has led Guardian Media’s coverage through inclement weather events like tropical cyclones and floods, as well as international climate conferences such as the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP27.

See you there!  #climatetrackercaribbean 🌐🌎

Climate Tracker (CT) is an international non-profit organisation, aiming to support, train and incentivise better climate journalism globally. We believe in the power of journalism but recognise that many young journalists don’t have the training, resources or support to identify and tell the climate stories they want to. We also recognise that this challenge is often greatest in the countries hardest hit by climate change. To address this, we:

  • Provide training and fellowships for young journalists around the world to tell better climate stories locally
  • Conduct action-oriented media research to better understand the biggest challenges,  trends, and obstacles to powerful climate reporting around the world
  • Fund young journalists to report on the world’s most pressing issues and cover the world’s biggest moments, UN negotiations and conferences 
  • Support global collaborations between young climate journalists, newsrooms and NGOs around the world

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Dizzanne Billy

Dizzanne Billy

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